Hanania G1Cambou JPGuéret PVaur LBlanchard DLablanche JMBoutalbi YHumbert RClerson PGenès NDanchin NUSIC 2000 Investigators.

ABSTRACT:

OBJECTIVE:

To assess actual practices and in-hospital outcome of patients with acute myocardial infarction on a nationwide scale.

METHODS:

Of 443 intensive care units in France, 369 (83%) prospectively collected data on all cases of infarction (within < 48 hours of symptom onset) in November 2000.

RESULTS:

2320 patients (median age 68 years, 73% men) were included, of whom 83% had ST segment elevation infarction (STEMI). Patients without STEMI were older and had a more frequent history of cardiovascular disease. Median time to admission was 5.0 hours for patients with and 6.5 hours for those without STEMI. Reperfusion therapy was used for 53% of patients with STEMI (thrombolysis 28%, primary angioplasty 25%). In-hospital mortality was 8.7% (5.5% of patients without and 9.3% of those with STEMI). Multivariate analysis found that age, Killip class, lower blood pressure, higher heart rate on admission, anterior location of infarct, STEMI, diabetes mellitus, previous stroke, and no current smoking independently predicted in-hospital mortality. At hospital discharge, 95% received antiplatelet agents, 75% received beta blockers, and over 60% received statins. Angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors were prescribed for 40% of the patients without and 52% of those with ST elevation.

CONCLUSIONS:

This nationwide registry, including all types of centres irrespective of their size and experience, shows continued improvement in patient care and outcomes. Time from symptom onset to admission, however, has not improved in recent years and reperfusion therapy is used for just over 50% of patients with STEMI, with an increasing use of primary angioplasty.

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